Let's use the aftermath of Superstorm Sandy as an example to illustrate the differences between collision and comprehensive. Within that storm, let's consider two events that might have happened: 1) a heavy tree branch fell on your car, or 2) you swerved to avoid a falling tree branch and wound up crashing into a tree. In the first event, you had no control over when or why a tree branch would fall on your car. This kind of accident would get reimbursed under your comprehensive policy. In the second situation, you were driving the car and ultimately swerved into the tree, which makes it a collision, and collision insurance therefore pays for the damages. Events like the hypothetical ones stated above are why it's important to differentiate between the two types of coverage.
“Florida has a larger percentage of riskier drivers,” points out Karen Kees, press secretary at the Florida Office of Insurance Regulation. “There are a high number of students due to the many universities in Florida, older drivers due to the large number of retirement communities, and drivers unfamiliar with the local roads due to our popularity with tourists.”
The main difference between collision and comprehensive coverage comes down to the question of what the driver controls. Collision insurance will cover events within a motorist's control or when another vehicle collides with your car. Comprehensive coverage generally falls under "acts of God or nature," or things that are typically out of your control when driving. These can include events such as a spooked deer, a heavy hailstorm, or a carjacking.
If you’re a first-time homebuyer who’s never had to deal with an insurance company before, State Farm may be your company. With a helpful website featuring industry-best educational resources, a quick and easy quoting process, and a stellar mobile app where you can view your policy, pay your bill, and file claims, State Farm offers one of the easier insurance experiences in the industry.
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Car sales stayed pretty flat last year with 17,274,250 vehicles driving off of dealer lots. This is a measly 0.3 percent increase over last year. The pain (for automakers) will continue in 2019, according to National Automobile Dealers Association (NADA). The NADA is forecasting vehicle sales of 16.8 million, which would represent about a 1.1 percent decline.
Meanwhile, the most expensive vehicle to insure side of the list is chock full of pricey and very high-powered cars. Once again, Mercedes is the big winner when it comes to the most costly vehicles to insure, with a total of seven models on our top 20 list. However, it was the Nissan GT-R that came out on top with a $ $3,941 annual insurance bill – and up $772 from 2014 when it also ranked at the top of the most expensive list.

Let's use the aftermath of Superstorm Sandy as an example to illustrate the differences between collision and comprehensive. Within that storm, let's consider two events that might have happened: 1) a heavy tree branch fell on your car, or 2) you swerved to avoid a falling tree branch and wound up crashing into a tree. In the first event, you had no control over when or why a tree branch would fall on your car. This kind of accident would get reimbursed under your comprehensive policy. In the second situation, you were driving the car and ultimately swerved into the tree, which makes it a collision, and collision insurance therefore pays for the damages. Events like the hypothetical ones stated above are why it's important to differentiate between the two types of coverage.
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