Within minutes, you’ll have an easy-to-update LeadPages™ template that you can modify for each of your clients’ marketing campaigns. Inside LeadPages™, you can also easily integrate this new opt-in page with your clients’ CRMs, duplicate it to run split tests, and even publish it on the LeadPages™ server or your clients’ Facebook fanpages if you wish.
4. How did they get to my landing page? Consider changing your message depending on where your users come from – a different message might be appropriate for users who arrived at your landing page coming from Google vs. from Twitter or Facebook. Businesses with more landing pages (30+) generate 7x more leads than those with only a handful, so there’s no denying their value. Ideally you want a tailored landing page for each ad group, but that’s a pretty hefty operation, so start where you can. Try beginning with one custom landing page per campaign, and add from there for individual ad groups when resources allow.
“It’s clear that the goal on this page is to get someone to leave their email address, but there is a lot to distract them, the very first link is to ‘Powered by SumoMe’ at the very top of the page, the social share icons are an overlay that appears after page load. You need to test all these, how many people click these, how many social shares do you get from the share widget, how valuable is the evidence that many people have shared the page – is it worth the distraction. How many people click SumoMe and don’t complete the form – testing will tell you all of this.

1. What is the goal? In an ideal world, what would visitors do upon reaching your landing page? Would they buy something? Fill out a form? Sign up for a newsletter? Download an ebook? Toss aside their keyboard, break out a harmonica, and play a sweet blues rift? The first step for any strategy is determining goals. (You have to define conversions before you can track conversions.)

Their homepage has an interesting graphic. It’s the first step of the sales funnel. A branding line similar to Mint.com’s, MailChimp’s slogan Being yourself makes all the difference really has nothing to do with the tool. That might be a good thing. It’s aspirational marketing not unlike Grasshopper above. It’s about identity, freedom, and self-expression — ideas that are bigger than a product.
Landing pages are often linked to social media, e-mail campaigns or search engine marketing campaigns in order to enhance the effectiveness of the advertisements. The general goal of a landing page is to convert site visitors into sales or leads. If the goal is to obtain a lead, the landing page will include some method for the visitor to get into contact with the company, usually a phone number, or an inquiry form. If a sale is required, the landing page will usually have a link for the visitor to click, which will then send them to a shopping cart or a checkout area. By analyzing activity generated by the linked URL, marketers can use click-through rates and conversion rate to determine the success of an advertisement.[3]
There’s a better solution: Build out an automated email follow-up campaign that speaks directly to this objection. Any time you encounter this problem, you can send that prospect information that seems designed just for them. A multi-month educational campaign may reduce their content anxiety and nurture them toward a sale. Yes, it’s work up front, but once finished, this campaign will work for you always.
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Clickfunnels: Review, Demo, Pricing and Features: