Hello – at first looking at the Imbound plugins for landing pages – call-to-action -and Imbound forms- I thought “what a great system plugin for WordPress. However – after creating a landing page and then tring to utilize the call to action by placing the shortcode in the landing page – it does not show up.These are the most important function of them all! So then I created an Imbound form instead for Email and although it seems to work – I find out later when testing it does not send out any email when tested. I wondered why I did not get any responses – not even one! Not to my notification email or to the one who subscribes. Unfortunately I jumped the gun and advertised the landing page, and now I do not know whether I have gotten any responses or not. I tried to get support earlier on when attempting to use these plugins because the help videos just disappeared after navigating away one time. I cannot find any directions or videos – nor can I get any support response. So it seems to be a good idea gone bad to me. Mistakes and malfunctions can and do happen with a lot of plugins, but the worst thing in the world is not getting any support what-so-ever! So I suppose there is not a lot of “going Premium” with these plugins.
“Some curated content from previous newsletters or a more substantial piece of content would help cement the relationship from the reader who hasn’t actually had any benefit from Jimmy yet.  There’s a free email course linked in the menu which would be a good start, or other ideas would be to get readers to consume content from you in other channels.
This is the stage where growth hacking, not to be confused with funnel hacking, comes into play. The purpose of the refinement or growth hacking stage is to analyze funnel results at each impression point to determine where you're losing customers. You will find customers dropping off at multiple points. Recognize the most critical points, prioritize and attack there first. Make changes and move forward, continuing to observe and accept that this stage has no end game. The quest for improved conversions requires continual analysis, refinement and experimentation.

Muzzle, a mac app that silences on-screen notifications, fully embraces this show don't tell mentality on their otherwise minimal landing page. Visitors to the page are greeted with a rapid-fire onslaught of embarrassing notifications in the upper left of the screen. Not only is the animation hilarious, it also manages to compellingly convey the app's usefulness without lengthly descriptions.
In a recent conversation I had with Perry Belcher, co-founder of Native Commerce Media, he told me that you also need to train your prospects to click on links. For example, you could have them click on a link of what interests them or link them to a blog post or eventually to a product or service that you're selling, but you need to train them to build a habit of clicking on those links from the very beginning.

The more contextually related your page headlines are to the calls-to-action people clicked on, the more likely those prospects are to make the connection that your landing page is for them. A great way to ensure your message match is strong is to write your ad CTA on a piece of paper and your landing page headline on another piece of paper underneath. Then look at your ad copy and turn the page. Does your paper click lead to a matched experience?
Landing page optimization (LPO) is one part of a broader Internet marketing process called conversion optimization, or conversion rate optimization (CRO), with the goal of improving the percentage of visitors to the website that become sales leads and customers. A landing page is a webpage that is displayed when a potential customer clicks an advertisement or a search engine result link. This webpage typically displays content that is a relevant extension of the advertisement or link. LPO aims to provide page content and appearance that makes the webpage more appealing to target audiences.
Once the prospect is in the proverbial funnel, you've peaked their awareness. That's the first stage of the funnel. However, getting a prospect aware of you is no simple feat. Depending upon how they've arrived to your website (organically or through a paid ad), those customers might view your funnel differently and your opt-in rates will vary significantly. 
Depending on what you’re selling and who you’re marketing to, you might answer that question in a number of different ways. For example, if bug-free software is a big deal to your potential customers, you may want to focus on how fine-tuned your software is. You might want to include a section about your support team, how many users you have, how you handle errors…you get the idea.

However, many businesses prefer not to add dozens or hundreds of additional marketing pages to their website—especially if they don’t plan on running a particular marketing campaign forever. In addition, creating a landing page on most websites can be a real headache, so unless you have solid design and coding skills, building your landing pages on your own website might be overwhelming.
A sales funnel is a marketing system. It’s the “ideal” process you intend your customers to experience as they go from Prospect to Lead to Customer to Repeat Buyer. Sales funnels have been around much longer than web marketing, but the online world is the best thing to ever happen to sales funnels because websites and email marketing make sales funnels easier to build.
There’s a better solution: It's not impossible with sales funnel management automation. Set up your system with the response you want, and it will be ready to send it immediately to any interested prospect—even the one who contacts you on Saturday at 3 am. As captured leads pass down the funnel, your sales automation platform can send added personalized emails that are just right for each moment.
×

Clickfunnels: Review, Demo, Pricing and Features: