To be honest, I haven’t really explored LeadPages’ sales page templates a whole lot because I tend to design them myself in WordPress. However, when I created my free Pinterest e-book, I decided to create a sales page-esque landing page, which gave more information about the freebie, much like a sales page would. I also used one of LeadPages’ sales page templates to design it.
If I was just starting out I would recommend starting with LeadPages so you have pre-made designs which are less customizable so you can get your head around what’s going on. But if you’ve had a bit of experience or are in the more advanced level, then I think getting a mid ranged ClickFunnels plan would be more appropriate. Either way, I don’t think you should cancel one account before the other, until you have had some time to play around and try them both out.

In a recent conversation I had with Perry Belcher, co-founder of Native Commerce Media, he told me that you also need to train your prospects to click on links. For example, you could have them click on a link of what interests them or link them to a blog post or eventually to a product or service that you're selling, but you need to train them to build a habit of clicking on those links from the very beginning.
“The danger here is, that navigation links present the visitor with the opportunity to exit the landing page without them converting. Studies from ConversionXL suggest that removing navigation links from the middle of the funnel landing pages seeing 16% and 28% lift in conversions, while top of the funnel landing pages are seeing an insignificant 0-4% increase in conversion rates.

Once the prospect is in the proverbial funnel, you've peaked their awareness. That's the first stage of the funnel. However, getting a prospect aware of you is no simple feat. Depending upon how they've arrived to your website (organically or through a paid ad), those customers might view your funnel differently and your opt-in rates will vary significantly. 

Capturing leads is the first step to the sales process. Some CRMs have the capability to capture leads who visit your website, submit a form, email your company, etc. So it’s easier for sales reps to start working with leads instead of wasting time on data entry. CRM can also segment leads based on predefined criteria and assign them to the right sales reps.
Hello Sunil.. thank you for your feedback, it’s great to hear that you are finding this article useful. Re your question: yes, it makes sense to follow-up as often as you need to to reach the decision-maker. At the early stage of cold calling / emailing / SMS you may have to follow-up 6-12 times with a combination of cold calls and cold emails before you get to kick-started with your prospective customer. Obviously if they unsubscribe or say no then you have to respect this. At later stages, non-response would indicate that your prospective customer no longer sees (or has doubts) about the potential value of the solution you are selling. After following-up 2 times at a later stage, I would make it easy for your prospect to voice their concerns by communicating something like: “I’m struggling to reach you, perhaps we could hop on a call for 5 minutes as I’d like to understand your current thoughts rather than assume you are no longer interested in progressing.”
When I first wrote this article in 2011, I mentioned how the marketing copy for Crazy Egg’s heat-mapping feature could have been stronger by better explaining how the tool helps customers to increase conversions. While this information is clearer now thanks to the detailed visuals and simple copy layout that allows the reader to skim and scan — it could be better by explaining a bit more.
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Clickfunnels: Review, Demo, Pricing and Features: