The image above is a glimpse at one of my webinars that I created in LeadPages. I embedded my live webinar presentation into a webinar template in LeadPages and also added a chat box (not pictured) below the webinar so that attendees could communicate and ask questions. Webinar software can be very pricy, but this solution allows you to do them nearly for free by embedding a live Google Hangouts broadcast. LeadPages is a great option for anyone getting started with webinars.

Now most importantly, this introduces a marketplace of landing pages for LeadPages customers where consumers will be able to purchase pages off other members (100% commissions are given to members). This is going to the largest pool of landing pages with a simple editor interface. This will also lead to 3rd party websites like LeadPages Ninjas and PSDtoLP to start designing + programming pages into LeadPages for customers who want to start making some revenue in the marketplace.
1. What is the goal? In an ideal world, what would visitors do upon reaching your landing page? Would they buy something? Fill out a form? Sign up for a newsletter? Download an ebook? Toss aside their keyboard, break out a harmonica, and play a sweet blues rift? The first step for any strategy is determining goals. (You have to define conversions before you can track conversions.)
Then you have a thank you page. This shows your appreciation for your customer, while also encouraging a deeper relationship with your business. For example, someone gave you their email on the Leadbox™ in exchange for a free eBook. You can now have a page that thanks them for signing up, gives them the eBook, and encourages them to purchase the associated workbook that enhances their eBook purchase. Watch Hubspot’s tutorial to create a thank you page that nurtures leads.

Only ask for the information they need. The more fields you ask visitors to fill out in your form, the less chance you have of them completing your offer. If your conversion requires a form, get the bare minimum of what you need – you can always ask for more info on the thank you page once the deed is done. While most users don’t have a problem providing their name and email address, asking for info about phone numbers and date of birth can cause your drop off rate to skyrocket to 50%. The rule of thumb is not to include more than seven fields in your lead gen form on your landing page.
To use with social media advertising. If you’re using Facebook ads, then one of the best things you can do is send viewers to a landing page, rather than to a blog post, or worst of all, a straight up sales page. Sending them to a landing page means that they only have ONE choice: to subscribe or leave. There are no other distractions to keep them from opting in, so if they like your offer, they’ll subscribe. If you are selling something, then you can then put them in an email sequence to pitch your product to them. See how that works?
To be honest, I haven’t really explored LeadPages’ sales page templates a whole lot because I tend to design them myself in WordPress. However, when I created my free Pinterest e-book, I decided to create a sales page-esque landing page, which gave more information about the freebie, much like a sales page would. I also used one of LeadPages’ sales page templates to design it.
There are two options: pro pricing and free signup. Signing up is as simple as possible. You just need to create a username and password. Once you get in and start using their tools, you’ll have to upgrade. The free account limits the number of forms you can use. When you hit that limit, you’re requested to upgrade. Otherwise your account won’t work.
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