Leadpages provides HTML5 templates for contact pages, webinar pages, sales lead and other types of landing pages that customers use to improve leads and get better conversions. The service runs on Google App Engine and uses technology such as Big Table to analyze the landing page data. Unlike competitors that use WYSIWYG (What You See Is What You Get), Leadpages does not have to translate into HTML. Instead the HTML pages are already made, which allows for the data to be decoupled and analyzed in the Google cloud stack. The pages are optimized for any mobile device.
Cons: My dislikes are more nit picky than complaints; setup of URLs can involve 2 separate screens, which makes it a little confusing at first. It is template driven and some of these are very Internet Marketing centric, so the look and style may not be a fit, but of course you can adapt and make these your own. A broader selection of templates will help, but they do have a community of developers adding to it daily, so this is likely a short term problem.
The header must be fully descriptive of what you're selling. Because, if the visitor doesn't understand exactly what you do immediately upon landing, they'll either bounce out of laziness or skim-read the rest of the page until they get the gist. Once they get that gist, they'll likely bounce anyway because they're still too lazy to re-read the page from the beginning.

“Now, for the vinegar. Starting with the headline, if creating headlines was a waste of time, why do I need this product at all? And why write headlines at all in the first place?  Do their customers really say to themselves (in their owns heads), ‘this is a waste of time?’ Probably not. They say something more like ‘I don’t want to do this,’ ‘I suck at this,’ or ‘I hate writing.’ Big difference. They attempted to call out a problem, but in this case there’s a big disconnect and it’s negative for no real reason. Instead, if they want to call out a problem, they need to pick one that the market connects to.


Wonder which option is best if I currently have only one product selling on Amazon (only, no e-comm on my own site)? I can see how Clickfunnels may be superior for up-selling, and “subscription” type sales, but if my product is one that perhaps my customer would by a few of for their own use and/or gifts, it strikes me that many of the advanced functions of Clickfunnels would be “wasted” on my current model. Appreciate any feedback on this.
Great article Matt! I have a product-based business (skincare to be precise) and I’ve been doing a lot of research on sales funnels over the past few days but only ever come across examples for service-based businesses and struggle to apply those to my business. I do offer a free skincare guide at opt in but can’t think of anything else for the follow up emails to create trust as well as a limited time offer. Would you have any suggestions?

Only ask for the information they need. The more fields you ask visitors to fill out in your form, the less chance you have of them completing your offer. If your conversion requires a form, get the bare minimum of what you need – you can always ask for more info on the thank you page once the deed is done. While most users don’t have a problem providing their name and email address, asking for info about phone numbers and date of birth can cause your drop off rate to skyrocket to 50%. The rule of thumb is not to include more than seven fields in your lead gen form on your landing page.


There’s a better solution: Build out an automated email follow-up campaign that speaks directly to this objection. Any time you encounter this problem, you can send that prospect information that seems designed just for them. A multi-month educational campaign may reduce their content anxiety and nurture them toward a sale. Yes, it’s work up front, but once finished, this campaign will work for you always.
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