So, I was happy to take her under contract and put something together for her. As you can see, this right here is inside of what we call an opt-in funnel. The way you create an opt-in funnel, if you're wondering, is this easy button right here. With one click you get an option, what's your goal, collect email, sell a product, host a webinar. I also have some unbelievable webinar funnels that maybe I can ... If I have time I'll show you later in this video, but real quick, when you choose collect emails you're obviously going to name it, and grouping and tagging is very important, I will do that with this one.
“Now, for the vinegar. Starting with the headline, if creating headlines was a waste of time, why do I need this product at all? And why write headlines at all in the first place?  Do their customers really say to themselves (in their owns heads), ‘this is a waste of time?’ Probably not. They say something more like ‘I don’t want to do this,’ ‘I suck at this,’ or ‘I hate writing.’ Big difference. They attempted to call out a problem, but in this case there’s a big disconnect and it’s negative for no real reason. Instead, if they want to call out a problem, they need to pick one that the market connects to.
This doesn’t necessarily mean that your visitors won’t scroll down the page to read more information. But hopefully, at least some percentage of your visitors will be ready to buy as soon as they arrive on your landing page, either because the email or link that brought them there already persuaded them, or because it’s not their first time visiting the page. Putting a call to action right near the top of the page just makes things easier on these visitors.

Full disclosure: IMPACT is a HubSpot partner -- but that's not why they're included here. IMPACT's landing pages have long been a source of design inspiration. I love the simple layout of the page, from the large headline copy and detailed featured image, to the outline that surrounds the form, to the colors and fonts that are very pleasing to the eye.

“Unfortunately, it then leads into a long, text heavy section all about the founder, with no value to the reader, and then flows into a very long list of goals and milestones, very few of which provide any value to the reader. There are a few good social proof pieces, but most of them are simply ‘me me me’. It reads more like a CV or an investor deck than a landing page for prospects.


Only ask for the information they need. The more fields you ask visitors to fill out in your form, the less chance you have of them completing your offer. If your conversion requires a form, get the bare minimum of what you need – you can always ask for more info on the thank you page once the deed is done. While most users don’t have a problem providing their name and email address, asking for info about phone numbers and date of birth can cause your drop off rate to skyrocket to 50%. The rule of thumb is not to include more than seven fields in your lead gen form on your landing page.
Overall: This software is a nice one-stop to create positive outcomes from (and for) visitors to our website. Before we tried ClickFunnels we were putting a lot of stress (i.e. asking a lot of) on our IT and web developer because every time we wanted to start a campaign we asked him to create a funnel using multiple software applications. With this software, it eliminates the need to bog down our web department as ClickFunnels allows one user to create, manage, and monitor a website funnel.
I’ve checked out a few of Russell Brunson’s content, on youtube, and he seems to really know his stuff. To be honest, at first I was skeptical and thought he could be a fraud but then I had a read of his book. It was actually really interesting and full of useful advice, also I seen that he’s speaking at Grant Cardone’s 10X seminar (or something like that), I know he’s legit so Russell – and his program – must be too!
Believe it or not, this works and everyday I see new subscribers sharing my opt-in form. Imagine if 10 people subscribed and you didn’t have a page like this. Well…then 10 people would have subscribed and that would be the end of that. BUT…if you have a viral sharing page, like the one above, then those 10 people could very well share it with all of their followers, resulting in more and more subscribers to your list. It’s pretty rad, y’all.
Hello Sunil.. thank you for your feedback, it’s great to hear that you are finding this article useful. Re your question: yes, it makes sense to follow-up as often as you need to to reach the decision-maker. At the early stage of cold calling / emailing / SMS you may have to follow-up 6-12 times with a combination of cold calls and cold emails before you get to kick-started with your prospective customer. Obviously if they unsubscribe or say no then you have to respect this. At later stages, non-response would indicate that your prospective customer no longer sees (or has doubts) about the potential value of the solution you are selling. After following-up 2 times at a later stage, I would make it easy for your prospect to voice their concerns by communicating something like: “I’m struggling to reach you, perhaps we could hop on a call for 5 minutes as I’d like to understand your current thoughts rather than assume you are no longer interested in progressing.”
On MailChimp’s pricing page, the focus is on getting you signed up for free, with an email, username, and password. They want to get you up and running and start using the product as soon as possible. They hope you will help them market themselves by using their products and spreading MailChimp further. Email marketing is often a one-too-many communication platform. The more you use it, the more likely you are to upgrade.
×

Clickfunnels: Review, Demo, Pricing and Features: