The sales process is not a straight line. This is why converting a lead to customer often takes its own course, and varies with business. Whether B2B or B2C sales, it’s important for sales reps to understand and visualize a lead’s journey; otherwise, they’re shooting in the dark. This is done by a series of steps which develops into what’s called the sales funnel—a concept that finds its way back to the 1890s.
Cons: The biggest issue for me is that all the work that is done on the Clickfunnels platform is at risk if they ever change their terms of service. I'm not saying that they ever would, but if company is ever sold, I could see a new owner possibly changing the fee structure or something like that. I've been stung before, so I believe this is a con compared to having your funnels in Wordpress. The other main con is the pricing. It's not cheap compared to similar functionality on Wordpress using a good quality theme.

As your sales reps qualify leads and identify opportunities, they’ll create an opportunity, aka deal in the CRM. Sales managers want to know the value of each deal and total deals by stage to prioritize the team’s efforts on high-value deals. In addition to this data being available in the CRM’s visual sales pipeline, you can also create detailed reports to further analyze deals, and add them to a dashboard to actively monitor their progress.
A/B testing, or A/B split testing, is a method for testing two versions of a webpage: version "A" and version "B". The goal is to test multiple versions of webpages (e.g., home page vs. product page) or one specific element that changes between variation A and variation B (such as having a lead form on the left hand side or having it placed on the right hand side), FAQ to determine which version is most appealing/effective. This testing method may also be known as A/B/n split testing; the n denoting more than 2 tests being measured and compared. The data for A/B testing is usually measured via click-through rate or an alternative conversion tracking method.[11]

Hello Sunil.. thank you for your feedback, it’s great to hear that you are finding this article useful. Re your question: yes, it makes sense to follow-up as often as you need to to reach the decision-maker. At the early stage of cold calling / emailing / SMS you may have to follow-up 6-12 times with a combination of cold calls and cold emails before you get to kick-started with your prospective customer. Obviously if they unsubscribe or say no then you have to respect this. At later stages, non-response would indicate that your prospective customer no longer sees (or has doubts) about the potential value of the solution you are selling. After following-up 2 times at a later stage, I would make it easy for your prospect to voice their concerns by communicating something like: “I’m struggling to reach you, perhaps we could hop on a call for 5 minutes as I’d like to understand your current thoughts rather than assume you are no longer interested in progressing.”


It’s super refreshing to see a platform with some new pages, kind of reminds me of Unbounce. As you can see in the image above, their range of page designs are quite vast (this is only for Opt Ins) and can be used in a number of ways. While they may not look as sexy as LeadPages landing pages right off the bat, at the end of the day all that matters is the conversion rates.
People not in your market — Learn how appealing and comprehensible your copy is to those who aren't familiar with your market or product. Do you give them enough context to want to know more? This will help cover the common problem where your site over-assumes base-level knowledge on behalf of your audience. This is important because there may be a lot of people on the edge of your market who'd become customers if they merely better understood why they should be.
The number and name of each stage may vary based on business type and sales process. But what the sales funnel represents is straightforward. You start with a lot of prospects who know your business. Sales reps qualify those prospects, and out of those, only some will proceed to the next stage to have a conversation with you. As sales reps continue to nurture leads towards the close, they trickle down the funnel until you’re left with actual customers.
Create eye catching headlines. Most good landing pages use the main headline to confirm the offer and use a sub heading for more explanation or value proposition (aka why your offer is awesome).  An example might be, “Free Facebook Marketing Ebook (headline), Learn how to get more Facebook followers, likes, and engagement from our marketing gurus (sub heading).” You’ll see plenty of great landing page headlines in our examples below, and you’ll see that some invert this so that the value proposition is the headline.
For example, an ecommerce site might model their visitors in a funnel, and identify that there is a large dropoff in users between visiting the shopping cart and actually completing the transaction. Using this data, the company can then form hypothesis as to why this is the case and test ideas for improving conversion rate, such as reducing form fields, establishing trust with seals, or offering limited time offers.
Prospecting and marketing are all the things you do to get people into the first of your sales funnel stages. Note that stages are broken into two or more steps wherever possible. A demo could be called a single stage, but in real life it involves a lot of things: contacting the customer, sending reminders, doing the demo, and then following up. Whatever your own sales stages look like, the support you need in managing them will be the same.
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