In addition, luxury cars come with high repair costs due to the quality of the materials used (teak wood is more expensive than plastic) and the fact that they are often loaded with the latest technology. “Sports cars and high-end luxury vehicles are almost always more expensive to insure because of repair costs. The materials used in these vehicles is often more expensive than the finishes in a moderately priced vehicle,” says Carole Walker, executive director with the Rocky Mountain Insurance Information Association
The big reason that D.C. makes the cut is population density. The entire district is basically an urban area, which leads to higher insurance rates. According to Census information, D.C has a population density of 11,020 people per square mile. While this number is certainly smaller than New York City, which clocks in at 28,256 people, it puts it well above other large cities, such as Houston and even Los Angeles.
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Texas is one of four states that have seen the highest increase in auto insurance premiums over the last seven years, according to Consumer Reports. While part of that jump is due to increased repair costs for the added technology in new cars, extreme weather also plays a role, with Hurricane Harvey a recent glaring example. Over half a million vehicles flooded in Texas during that storm, significantly raising insurers’ annual losses for 2017, and in turn, causing around an 8% jump in premiums this year. Add the fact that Texas is number one in the nation for hail damage losses, and its position at the top of the rate hike leaderboard is no surprise.

Auto Insurance is required by law for drivers in most states. Drivers who own a car and drive it often should definitely have auto insurance to cover the risk of damages to their car and personal injury and the liability of harm to other people and property. Otherwise, repairs and medical costs, particularly when you’re liable for an accident, can be very expensive.
This year’s rankings are dominated by SUVs and CUVs, which matches what is happening in the automotive market. According to industry tracker, LMC Automotive, 84 percent of the vehicles sold by General Motors in the U.S. market will be a truck or SUV by 2022. Ford's ratio of SUV and truck sales will grow to 90 percent and Fiat Chrysler's could hit 97 percent.

On average, an at-fault property damage accident will raise your premium by an average of $612 per year. Because most insurance providers will charge you for three years after an accident, this $612 increase equates to more than $1,800 in total fees. If you’re thinking of filing a claim, consider the overall cost of the claim versus what the claim would cost to pay out of pocket. Compare this $1,837 penalty — plus your deductible (if applicable) — to the out-of-pocket expense. While this is nice information to know before filing a claim, it won’t help if you’ve already filed a claim. If you have an at-fault accident on your insurance history, consider USAA or State Farm.
To any good parent, our babies are our babies, be it a child, or an automobile. I must say that the statement "The driver carting around children tends to be more cautious than the person driving a muscle car" in most cases simply isn't true. Hot rod, muscle car and restored car owners are usually the type of driver that will go out of their way to park away from the other cars. Consider the fact that many of these cars have been built or restored by the driver. Typically the case is this person has an tremendous amount of time and money invested in the vehicle (Have you ever spent $15,000 on a paint job?). A restored muscle car or hot rod is a lot like driving a museum piece, many are rare, some are irreplaceable, so these drivers are many times more likely to be much more cautious so as not to harm their "baby."
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Naturally, insurance companies use your driving past as an indicator of how you will drive in the future. It can be difficult to find affordable car insurance if you have a checkered driving history. While it’s very unlikely you will find an insurance company that won’t increase your premium after an at-fault accident or other violation, the degree of the rate increase will vary by company. Let’s compare rate increases for some common violations across major insurance companies.
Still, there’s no denying that Allstate is popular in Texas, with the second-most market share of any company at roughly 11.2%. It’s also one of the only companies to offer “gap” insurance for new cars, something State Farm and Farmers are both missing. And if your Allstate quote is lower than its competitors, it could mean the difference in whether you can afford comprehensive and/or UM/UIM coverage, two especially valuable add-ons in Texas.
Financial experts often say it’s smart to drop collision when you drive an old car, then put your car insurance savings in a fund earmarked for emergency repairs or buying a new car. However, when you’re trying to decide when to drop collision coverage, the answer really comes down to your personal finances. “If you’re not absolutely sure that you could deal with paying for repairs or completely replacing your vehicle at a moment’s notice, or else going without a vehicle until you could save for a replacement, it’s best to err on the side of caution and pay the extra premium for collision coverage,” The Simple Dollar advises.
Auto Insurance is required by law for drivers in most states. Drivers who own a car and drive it often should definitely have auto insurance to cover the risk of damages to their car and personal injury and the liability of harm to other people and property. Otherwise, repairs and medical costs, particularly when you’re liable for an accident, can be very expensive.
Collision and comprehensive insurance are two optional types of auto insurance where your insurer pays for repairs to your vehicle. While there are other optional auto insurance coverages, liability, comprehensive, and collision are three of the most common. These coverages work hand-in-hand to repair or replace most of the damages to your car. It's important to know the difference, and make sure you're adequately covered.
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